Basic is great

Encouraged by the response to my last post (https://www.iamit.org/blog/2018/06/the-ian-amit-spectrum-of-pentesting-efficacy/ for those who missed it), and following up on a couple of recent Twitter/LinkedIn/WhatsApp conversations, I’d like to emphasize the importance of doing basic and simple work (in security, but it probably also applies to everything else).


We are working in a weird industry. The industry encourages unique thinking, contrarian ones, and creativity. Guess what? The kinds of people who find themselves “fitting in” is more often than not your typical ‘hacker’ with the stereotypical social baggage that comes with it. It also means (and of course, I’m generalizing) a short fuse, lack of respect/patience to people who are not as immersed in the cybers as they are, and that often creates the scenarios that Phil describes in his post.

Moreover, those of us who have been around the block a couple of times, also know and realize that there is no silver bullet solution to security. We are in it because we realize it is a constantly moving and evolving practice. Because we love the challenge, the changing landscape, and the multitude of domains involved in practicing security properly.

Which gets me to the basics. 


This, and other conversations (the notorious “Cyberberet” WhatsApp channel for the Israeli guys), which revolve around the latest and greatest [insert cyber-marketing-buzz/fud] solution. So here is my old-man eye-roll for you…

I earned the right to roll my eyes. 20+ years and counting 😉

The reason being, I still see a lot of organizations trying to decipher how they are going to integrate said [insert cyber-marketing-buzz/fud] product, while failing to have a basic security program.

They often don’t have one, because they never bothered to perform a proper threat modeling exercise where they “dare” ask their executive leadership what do they care about (i.e. what are they afraid of). I’ve seen companies invest huge $ in fancy SIEM solutions while not having a basic authentication mechanism for their employees (dare I say MFA?). And even the inability to get a somewhat consistent asset inventory and tracking, which comes with the usual excuse – all this cloud stuff is very dynamic, we don’t have racked servers like in the olden days. To which my rebuttal – all this cloud stuff makes it easier to track your assets. You are just lazy and incompetent.

Compound that with an approach which I sadly see some of my colleagues take, which says – forget about all those products, you are going to get breached. You need to embrace the [other-fud-buzz-cyber] approach where attackers [pre-cog / deceived / lost / identified before they get to you / hacked_back / …]. Hmmmm, let me guess – you must have a company operating in that space, right? 

So no. Neither precog, nor deception or hacking back will save you either. And I’ve played attacker against these things in the past, and (shocked face) always won against them. What you should be doing in getting back to basics.

You know – the stuff they teach at intro to infosec 101. Layered security. Logging, monitoring and anomaly detection (behavioral – after baselining and such). Getting the basics of authentication and authorization done properly. Having a patch management practice coupled with a vulnerability scanning one. Knowing what is your threat model. What assets are you protecting. Which do you need to prioritize over others. What is your threat landscape (and no – no matter how fancy or ninja/8200/NSA the threat feed is, it most likely has zero applicability to your threat landscape). What controls do you have in place (technological, and others) and how effective are they.

Image result for polishing turd

“Playing” with these basic elements can, and will have a huge impact over your security posture. Much more than trying to fit a fancy “cyber” solution without any context over what you are getting done (see equivalent image to the left…). But you know what – don’t take my word for it, ask any competent pentester who’s faced both – a properly executed security program, and for comparison one of the latest buzz-worthy products. You’ll get the same response: it’s harder to overcome the security program, while dealing with a magic product requires a one-time effort to render it moot.

Now go back to the basics. There’s no shame in it, you’ll get to play with the fancy stuff a bit later, and when you do, make sure to come up with what YOU need from it rather than get starry-eyed while listening to the sales folk try to wow you 😉

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