Tag Archives: Ian Amit

Sexy Defense

So, Source Boston proved to be a great venue for theĀ inaugurationĀ of the Sexy Defense paper and talk that I was working on recently. Had a great time both developing the concepts, as well as discussing them before, on stage, and especially after the talk.

I really was amazed by the great feedback that people had to this, especially from some of my more respected peers. It’s always a great feeling to get an “attaboy” from people you consider experts in their fields.

For convenience, here is the slide-deck I used during the talk. Would love to get more feedback and ideas for pushing this forward into more organizations, and to hear about ways to improve both on the strategy itself, as well as on how to “sell” it, or get organizational “buy-in” internally.

Last but not least – this could not have been done without the support and the peer-review from some of my friends and colleagues: Chris Nickerson, Brian Honan, Chris John Riley, Wim Remes, and Leon van der Eijk. Thanks for going through this and providing excellent commentary and insights!

 

Update: Dark Reading have posted a great article by Robert Lemos covering the topic, with a really insightful analysis and additional views.

Post Brucon thoughts – guesstimates in an engineering field

So, another epic Brucon has ended, and while everyone is getting their thoughts together again (the amount of super smart people I have had the pleasure to have conversations with is unimaginable), I wanted to post a quick recap.

First things first – numbers. I’ve been working with the FAIR methodology quite a while now, and have actually (with the kind permission of Jack Jones) integrated some of its elements into the Penetration Testing Execution Standard (PTES). Watching the discussions that started after Jack’s talk at Brucon was heartwarming. Pentesters and security practitioners finally “get it”, was divine. Working in a field of engineering that has the least engineering in the sense of how it’s applied to businesses has been frustrating to say the least. With the ability to effortlessly connect the technical elements of vulnerabilities and exploits to business-speak has been one of my personal challenges (and hopefully strengths), and being able to tilt the industry even a little towards that direction is something that we all needed for a long time.

A quick “teaser” to add on top of it (which has been previewed in my talk) is the ability to also marry in the social media risk into the risk management practice (look out for some more cool research and insights coming from that direction very soon!).

Which leads me to the last point – the ever evolving presentation I use to deliver the message about data exfiltration is provided for your viewing pleasure. Don’t fear the >100 slide count – it’s mostly the “build” effects that I left in for clarity.

Looking forward for some more discussions and developments in the way that we as an industry are justifying what we practice (if it wasn’t obvious by now – go check out what FAIR is, and then start thinking on how to integrate it into what you do…).